Can I upgrade my memory (RAM)?

The 3 components when buying RAM

If you haven’t added memory yet then most likely yes, you can!  Just to be fair, we are talking about RAM (also referred to as memory), or what will speed up your computer.  All computers have a maximum amount of memory (RAM) that they can run, but usually aren’t at capacity when you purchase your machine new.

Installing RAMRAM, or Random Access Memory, works with the CPU to process your data.  It doesn’t store data long-term.  In fact, once you turn off your computer, RAM dumps it’s memory.  Your hard drive (and a small part of the CPU) stores the data when you turn it off.  The speed of your computer is determined by these 2 components: RAM and CPU.  Since upgrading the CPU can be costly, increasing the amount of RAM is the best first option if there is still room to upgrade.

See how much RAM you have by Right-Clicking on My Computer (This PC for Win 10) and clicking Properties.  It should list the total RAM (usable in parentheses).  That’s all it will tell you, though.  8GB of RAM is kinda the minimum amount needed for basic computing.  Use your computer brand’s website (Dell.com, Toshiba.com, etc.) to research your computer model and find how many slots you have and a total amount and type of RAM it can hold.

 

An alternative to finding out how much RAM you have (and can have) is to use something like Crucial’s RAM checker found here: http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/systemscanner

 

1. Determine the amount of gigabytes (GB) you have and want

Check the specs for your specific computer and buy an equally distributed number of sticks for these slots.  Most laptops have 2 slots and most new desktops have 4 slots.  It’s best to have the same amount of memory per each pair of slots.  For ex. use 2 sticks of 4GB of memory for your laptop to make it have 8GB, or use 2 sticks of 8GB in paired slots to make 16GB.  On a desktop, use 4 sticks of 2GB (or 2 sticks of 4GB) for your desktop to have 8GB.  Just keep them paired.

 

2. DIMM or SO-DIMM?

So-DIMM RAM

So-DIMM RAM (for laptops)

There are two different types of RAM, so check in the specs to be sure to get the right kind.  The most notable are the laptop sticks, known as So-Dimm (small outline dual in-line memory module) or Notebook RAM, found usually in laptops (and some desktop MACS).  These are smaller modules.  Desktop RAM, or DIMM (dual in-line memory module) RAM is longer.

 

3. Check the SD-RAM version

Computers from the 1970s to 1990s used DDR RAM.  DDR SDRAM, also called DDR1 SDRAM, has been superseded by DDR2 SDRAMDDR3 SDRAM and DDR4 SDRAM. None of its successors are forward or backward compatible with DDR1 SDRAM, meaning DDR2, DDR3, and DDR4 memory modules will not work in DDR1-equipped motherboards, and vice versa.”

DIMM RAM

DIMM RAM (for desktops)

Most computers today use DDR3 (PC3) or DDR4 (PC4) RAM.  The number of pins will change with these types, as well as the speed of the RAM.  The number PC-1600 or PC-2100 is the clock speed in MHz and doesn’t matter for typical computing today.  Gamers, however, should check with their motherboard manufacturer to see which clock speed to use.

Read the details of the memory to make sure you are getting the right amount.  Below is a total of 16GB of RAM, packed in 2-8GB sticks.  It’s DDR3 laptop (So-Dimm) memory!  RAM exampleThe brand of RAM usually doesn’t matter much.  MACS, however, can sometimes be picky.  I always use Crucial brand RAM in Macs.  But again, check with your computer specs for other options.  Cheaper is usually just as good!

That’s about all there is to it.  Now get a small screw driver and open the back compartment of your laptop and swap out your memory!  Sounds a bit simplistic.  Well. if you need more help let us know by calling or opening a support ticket on our Help Desk.  Best wishes for faster processing!

This article was first seen on the Help Desk of MyComputerSolutionz.com. All Rights Reserved.

 


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Mark is an entrepreneur from Greensboro, NC. He began working with WordPress in 2002 and has since been fine-tuning his webpage experience with the designing of e-commerce websites and blogs for businesses. He's a 1998 graduate of Elon College with a BA in Corporate Communications. Mark's a proud father to a 5-year-old daughter and husband to a precious wife.

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2 thoughts on “Can I upgrade my memory (RAM)?

  1. Thanks Mark. Not up to speed regarding the sections on DIMM/SO DIMM and SD Ram versions

    Did check my GB: I have 8GB and have only used .13GB I also checked on my computer performance.
    I have a base of 3.4. My processor and ram sub scores are 5.6. I guess that these numbers are ok.

    • Good point Peter. When you refer to “using .13GB” what you are probably seeing is the RAM installed and then in parentheses it will show available to use. The system has tied up that .13 but the total used is found in clt-alt-delete (task manager) and is probably m using more like 2-3GB sitting idle.

      Having 8GB is a typical amount in the last 5 years and works well for everyday computing. Thanks for jumping in with the comment!